Author Archives: GOSO Staff

For Immediate Release Getting Out and Staying Out

GOSO ANNOUNCES NEW CEO: Brooklyn Navy Yard exec Dr. Jocelynne Rainey to succeed founder Mark L. Goldsmith

Getting Out and Staying Out (GOSO), the nonprofit that has helped more than 10,000 formerly incarcerated and justice-involved young men access education, achieve emotional well-being and secure meaningful employment, has named Jocelynne Rainey, Chief Administrative Officer of the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation, as its new President & CEO.

Achieving Goals, with Your Support

For 15 years, Getting Out and Staying Out (GOSO) has been a pillar of support for justice-involved young men in New York City. Participants know that they can count on GOSO to be an accepting, safe space to thrive as they reenter their communities and build productive lives.

GOSO in New York Daily News

New York Daily News: “How to close Rikers: Criminal justice reform really depends on thousands of individual interactions with New Yorkers”

If criminal justice reform is to succeed in New York, it’s going to require more people with the passionate commitment of Omar Jackson. At first glance, criminal justice reform appears to be a winner. The jail population in the city has been declining steadily, from around 11,700 in 2013 to just under 7,200 as of September 2019.

food is fuel featured image

Food is Fuel for Success at GOSO

As a community-based organization, GOSO strives to create a community-minded atmosphere that will help our guys thrive emotionally, which allows them to thrive in the areas of education and employment (the Three E’s!). Workshops, programs, conversations, laughter, games and art — all of these are considered central to that mission. 

In Their Own Words: Marvin B.

I grew up in Harlem; it’s where I went to school, played basketball, all of that. At a young age, I got caught up in things that led me to Rikers Island when I was 16 years old. When I came out after 1 year there, I was working towards doing something good with my life, and then I got caught up in a different situation that wasn’t my fault. Everyone that I knew was arrested. That’s when I went to prison upstate, where I spent 25 months.